Am I Missing Something?

We have several friends who are opposed to securing our country’s borders. That is ok; they are entitled to their opinions.

What puzzles us about this stance is that the majority of them live in urban settings with their yards surrounded by privacy fences. Why do they have fences around their backyards? While discussing this with some friends, one woman suggested that perhaps the fences in city neighborhoods were to mark property lines, and without the fences, perhaps the property owners wouldn’t know where their property lines are. Okay, we’ll give her that one. She may have a point. But why a fence? Why not just mark the property line with a rope that people can easily pass under or step over?

And, why do most of these fences have gates that have latches and locks? Someone else suggested that maybe these fences are to keep in the pets or to keep a small child from wandering off onto the road. Okay. We’ll give him that one.

But, if the fence and the gate and the lock are to secure anything other than a pet, or if the fence, gate, and lock are for anything other than a child’s safety, what or whom are you, as the property owner, securing the backyard from?

Could it be to keep out uninvited persons who might just walk into your backyard? And, if so, could these uninvited persons pose a possible threat to property on the premises or persons living in the home? Could people who wander uninvited into your yard and home also be a possible threat to others living in the area?

Maybe the fence around your home is to keep unwanted/uninvited people out of your pool. What if the uninvited guests didn’t have a pool of their own? Shouldn’t they be able to use your pool? With or without your consent? When they want to? And bring as many of their family members and friends as they want to? Why or why not?

On this thought, why even put a fence around a public pool? Who cares whether the swimmers come in legally (paid their fee) or illegally (non-paying customers)—they just want to swim. Why shouldn’t they? After all, while they’re there, they may jump start the pool’s economy—they might buy something at the concession stand or put some quarters into the coke machine. They might even stay and clean the pool after hours, providing labor that no one else wants to do. But wait, if they don’t have to pay for the privilege of swimming in the pool, why should they pay for a soda or a snack? Why should they stay and clean up the pool they used illegally?

While not all of the friends we speak of have backyard fences and pools, they do have one thing in common—doors on their houses. Why do houses in this country typically have doors? The obvious answer is to make our homes weather proof—to keep out the wind and the rain, the hot and the cold. And, we are glad for doors on houses. But, why are there locks on the doors to these houses? We have had some pretty severe storms, but none required locking the doors to keep out the weather. Closing the door was adequate to keep out the weather. Why the lock? The obvious answer is that the lock is supposed to provide some form of protection to keep those inside the house safe. Safe from what? Not the weather.

If you lock your doors at night, for safety, to keep out unwanted, uninvited people who might intend you harm, wouldn’t that same principle hold true for our country? Could people who just walk into our country uninvited be a threat to us?

Maybe the people who came into your home uninvited didn’t intend you harm. They just wanted to watch your big screen. After all, they don’t have one. And maybe they just wanted to cook a steak on your grill. They just wanted something better than their own menu and equipment. They didn’t want to wait and take the necessary steps to purchase their own grill and steaks, so they decided to use your stuff. I don’t understand why that should upset you. After all, you didn’t get to where you are on your own, and, if you look closely at the package you are eating from and the utensils you are cooking with, I’ll bet you didn’t grow it/raise it or build it. It was built/made somewhere else. Maybe in the same place where these folks are coming from who just want to come in and use what you have.  Oh, but wait, you paid for and bought the items in your home. So, whether you built, grew, or raised these items yourself is immaterial. You paid for them. That makes them yours.

Maybe these people who wandered into your home uninvited just needed a can of green beans. And, it was easier to get one from your pantry than to go to the store. That should be okay with you, right?

We talked about locking the doors at night for personal safety. What about when you leave your home to go out, say for work, or to church, or anywhere? Do you lock the doors then? What person are you protecting then, if no one is home? Ah, it’s not about safety, now, is it? It’s about property. Unless you have that pesky property that has that nasty tendency to sprout legs and try to escape on its own unless you lock it in, you are protecting it from someone else entering your domain and taking your stuff. Our question is, if securing your home is prudent and considered okay to do, why is securing our country not?

Regardless of your political affiliation, we all understand the necessity of security. In some cities, tickets are even issued to homeowners who leave up garage doors and who leave unlocked houses or vehicles, thereby, “tempting” criminals and thieves who create a bigger work load for police departments and create bad statistics for the town’s crime rate, thus discouraging tourism. It’s bad for business all the way around. So, tell me again why securing our borders is a bad thing? We’re not locking them down—no one in or out. We are simply securing them against illegal activity. Isn’t that what you are trying to do for your home?

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